From Evolution to Revolution

We’ve Got a “Lock” On It.

Older processes just can’t compare. Today, if your basement waterproofing contractor is not using the Water Lock™ Plus System, you (and your home) are throwing your hard–earned money “down the drain.”

 

Other Waterproofing Methods

Pre–Construction System

Pre–Construction System

Typically installed by a builder during construction, this system easily clogs.

Advantages

  • System is installed by builder during construction

Disadvantages

  • System sits beside the footer in the dirt and can easily clog
  • Usually clogs over time
  • Pipe is sometimes crushed and discharge is covered during construction

Pipe and Rock Method

Pipe and Rock Method

This option uses gravel as a filter. But pipe may collapse. Water capacity and clogging are flaws in the system.

Advantages

  • Added gravel serves as filter
  • Materials used are inexpensive and readily available

Disadvantages

  • System sits beside the footer and can easily clog
  • Slits in the pipe may not be large enough to accommodate excessive amounts of water
  • Pipe can crush or collapse
  • Excessive amounts of concrete may be removed for installation, 12” – 24”

Glue Down Method

Glue Down Method

Advantages

  • Concrete removal is not required, quick to install

Disadvantages

  • The cost of the system is not relative to the product or its performance
  • Water must enter the home before the system activates
  • The system cannot handle large volume water flow
  • The bond to the floor can loosen over time
  • Water continues to wick up the wall
  • The open system allows water to stagnate and contributes to higher humidity

Segmented Pipe Method

Segmented Pipe Method

Advantages

  • It sits on top of the footer away from dirt
  • Requires less concrete breakout

Disadvantages

  • Gravel used may eventually clog the system
  • Large amounts of water may overtake the system
  • ¾ of the pipe is closed to water entry
  • Some segmented pipe can cause clogging or may leak
  • Most are all one–chamber systems; no redundancy